Stars Over Longview 2019

I was honored to give the invocation at the 2019 Stars Over Longview Award Lunch. This event recognizes twelve women who have made an impact on the community. The prayer I gave is below. If you share it, please give proper attribution.

Stars Over Longview Prayer– 2019

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

 

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Sermon: Leading Us

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Below is the link to a sermon I gave at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Longview, Texas entitled “Leading Us” based on Matthew 2:1-12.

Sermon Link

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Book Review: Sabbath As Resistance

 

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It’s no secret that we live in an ultra-high paced, interconnected society and world.   We are constantly going from one place and headed to another.  There are t ball games, dance practices, job requirements, family commitments and everything in between; on top of that there is trying to find quality time with your spouse and/or children and before you know it, it is 10 pm and your “to-do list” has about three things checked off (one of which is “make a to-do list”).

How many times have we exclaimed, “There are not enough hours in the day!”?

While this might be a common feeling, is it something that we have placed on ourselves?  Can that email wait until the morning?  Do I have really need to volunteer for this?

All the while we are working feverishly we are complaining about not having downtime but when we have the downtime we are guilty of not doing anything.  This in lies​ the problem.

As of people of faith, we have a good guide for how our time and self-care​ needs to take place but over time​ it has shifted making sure we attend church to “keep the Sabbath holy.”

In our world of instant communication and work overload, we are not good about the Sabbath-keeping commandment.

Walter Brueggemann wrote a wonderful book about just this problem, Sabbath as Resistance: Saying No to the Culture of Now.

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Discussions about the Sabbath often center around moralistic laws and arguments over whether a person should be able to play cards or purchase liquor on Sundays. In this volume, popular author Walter Brueggemann writes that the Sabbath is not simply about keeping rules but rather about becoming a whole person and restoring a whole society. Importantly, Brueggemann speaks to a 24/7 society of consumption, a society in which we live to achieve, accomplish, perform, and possess. We want more, own more, use more, eat more, and drink more. Keeping the Sabbath allows us to break this restless cycle and focus on what is truly important: God, other people, all life. Brueggemann offers a transformative vision of the wholeness God intends, giving world-weary Christians a glimpse of a more fulfilling and simpler life through Sabbath observance.

Brueggemann weaves his scholarly knowledge of the Old Testament and the modern world into a package that is digestible​.  He argues that for one to take a break on a Sabbath is to resist the world around them.

As we begin 2019, let us resolve to make more time for our own Sabbath time and resist the world and culture of now, now, now and go, go, go.

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Currently Reading

What’s on your reading list?

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

So Now What?

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We have come through January 1, 2019, and have celebrated the coming a new year. So now the question remains, so now what?  What are we going to do with the gift of a new year that we have been given?

Rev. David Hansen poses this question beautifully.

We have an opportunity to give more of ourselves, love more people, give more faithfully in 2019. Are we up for the challenge?  I truly hope so.

Let’s get to work.

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Sermon: Clothes for Christmas

This sermon was given at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Longview, TX entitled “Clothes for Christmas” based on Colossians 3:12-17.

Sermon Link

 

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Happy New Year!

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May your 2019 be filled with joy and happiness!

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

How Can Someone Be So Cold Hearted?

In the sea of social media, you are bound to find people who disagree and think differently than you. It is one of the things that people laud as the best things about the internet and social media, the sharing of ideas in a community space.

The other day I was scrolling through Twitter and I saw a story about a two-year-old child who had died in California days after his mother had arrived to see him. She had been barred from entering the country due to the travel restrictions put in place by the Government since she was from Yemen. As tragic as that is, I saw someone commenting about a tweet sent by Kurt Schlichter, a columnist at townhall.com.

The tweet is below but I’ll save you a scroll; his response… “I don’t care.”

A child died from a rare condition, his mother was kept from him for over a year and the only sympathy you can muster Kurt is “I don’t care”?

What a cold-hearted, mean-spirited, hateful response. I have never met this person, I have never read anything else by him but I find his response absolutely appalling. I don’t care what you think about people from Yemen, I don’t care what you think about politics, I don’t care what car you drive or what you got for Christmas, the fact remains that a HUMAN BEING died, not only a human but a CHILD.

If it was a joke, it was in deeply poor taste; if he meant it then I have no words.

He has since removed the tweet but has offered no apology that I am aware of.

Kurt, if you are reading this, America should be a place where children are loved and cared for, not discarded because you deem them unworthy. I urge you to meet with the family and hear how a government travel ban hurt them, listen to their stories about having a sick child halfway across the world.

Do the right thing.

Let’s a resolve in 2019 to do the right thing.

I do care that a child died and you should too.

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Merry Christmas!

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May the hope, joy, peace, and love of the Christ Child dwell in your heart!

Merry Christmas!

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Advent Calendar 2018

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In the church calendar, December 2 begins the season of Advent. It last four weeks and ends on Christmas Day. 

It is a special time where followers of Christ are called reflect on what the coming of Christ means for them. It is time to wait and be prayerful.

In a world where we are bombarded by lights and Christmas sales constantly, Advent reminds us that the light of the world will continue to grow in our midst, we must be willing to look for it. 

Below is a Advent Prayer calendar in two forms, a PDF and Photo. You can download it to your computer or phone so you can have it with you where ever you go this Advent season. 

Use this calendar each day of Advent to prepare yourself for the coming of Jesus into the world.

Each day has a scripture and something to pray for or to reflect on. Let us journey to together to find the Christ-child, the source of all hope, peace, joy and love this Advent.

In Christ,

Rev. Evan

Click one of the icons below.

Advent Calendar 2018 PDF

Advent Calendar 2018 jpeg


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